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GDC-0973 Widely Used Myths As Opposed To The Authentic Pieces Of Information

Sensitivity and specificity were defined in terms of correct or overtriage classification, and undertriage was defined as a misclassification. A total of 900 patients were triaged. Of these, Natural Product Library 10 patients were lost due to missing ED or triage notes, leaving 890 patients for analysis. Complete triage notes were available for 875 patients (97%) triaged using the ISS, 876 (97%) using the ESI, and 872 (97%) using the MTS. The characteristics for all 900 patients are presented in Table?1. Patients referred by the GP to the specialist (mean?�� SD age?= 48?�� 27?years) were significantly older than self-referred patients (mean?�� SD age?= 33?�� 20?years; p?<?0.001). Patients arriving by ambulance (mean?�� SD age?= 54?�� 28?years) were significantly older than patients arriving by private vehicle (mean?�� SD age?= 34?�� 21?years; p?<?0.001). In self-referred patients, no significant differences in age were found between patients treated by the ED physician only and those referred from ED physician to a specialist. In all patients available for analysis, the number of patients in each urgency level in each of the triage systems is shown in Figure?1. When the three triage systems were compared as four-level systems, the distribution of urgency levels was shown to be significantly different (Friedman test, p?<?0.006). The same was true when the ESI and the MTS were compared as five-level systems (Friedman test, p?<?0.001). In the ISS, more patients were scored ��very urgent�� than in the ESI and the MTS. Furthermore, according to the MTS, significantly fewer patients belonged to level 5 than according to the other systems. In 890 patients available for analysis, the number of resources was strongly associated with the urgency level in all triage systems. The mean number of resources by urgency level and triage system is presented in Figure?2. In 890 patients, the number of patient admissions was strongly associated with the urgency level in all triage systems. The distribution of admission by urgency level and triage system is presented in Figure?3. In 890 patients, the length of ED stay was strongly associated with the urgency level in all triage systems. Median LOS per urgency level and triage system is presented in Figure?4. Patients in the highest urgency levels had the longest LOS, except for patients assigned to urgency level 1. Of 890 patients, a total of 428 (48%) were treated by an ED physician only. Seven forms were incomplete and were therefore excluded. Statistically significant differences were found in the percentages of under- and overtriage when all systems were compared as four-level systems. The percentages of undertriage were 8.3% for the ISS, 13.5% for ESI, and 11.2% for the MTS. The highest agreement (64.8%) with the reference standard was found for the ISS, while the highest overtriage (29%) was found for the MTS (Figure?5).</div>
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